Social Media

Picture of New independent watchdog to keep extremists off internet

New independent watchdog to keep extremists off internet

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson walks down the street near United Nations headquarters in New York, Monday, Sept. 23, 2019.

Details

Picture of Facebook suspends thousands of apps but user impact unclear

Facebook suspends thousands of apps but user impact unclear

This July 16, 2013, file photo, shows a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook says it has suspended tens of thousands of apps made by about 400 developers as part of an investigation following the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Starting in March 2018, Facebook started looking into the apps that have access to its users' data. The probe came after revelations that data mining firm Cambridge Analytica used ill-gotten data from millions of Facebook users through an app, then used the data to try to influence U.S. elections.

Details

Picture of Facebook auto-generating pages for Islamic State, al-Qaida

Facebook auto-generating pages for Islamic State, al-Qaida

Pages from a confidential whistleblower's report obtained by The Associated Press, along with two printed Facebook pages that were active on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, are photographed in Washington. Facebook likes to say that its automated systems remove the vast majority of prohibited content glorifying the Islamic State group and al-Qaida before it’s reported. But a whistleblower’s complaint shows that Facebook itself has inadvertently produced dozens of pages in their names.

Details

Picture of Facebook expands new tool aiming to shrink ‘news deserts’

Facebook expands new tool aiming to shrink ‘news deserts’

This July 16, 2013, file photo shows a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook is trying to coax “news deserts” into bloom with the expansion of a tool that provides people with local news and information, but says it still has a lot to learn. The social media giant said Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, it is expanding its “Today In” service to 6,000 cities and towns across the U.S., up from 400 previously.

Details

Picture of States expected to target Google in new antitrust probe

States expected to target Google in new antitrust probe

In this May 1, 2019, file photo a man walks past a Google sign outside with a span of the Bay Bridge at rear in San Francisco. A group of states are expected to announce an investigation into Google on Monday, Sept. 9, to investigate whether the tech company has become too big.

Details

Picture of As feds loom, states hit Facebook, Google with new probes

As feds loom, states hit Facebook, Google with new probes

In this Tuesday, April 18, 2017, file photo, a conference worker passes a demo booth at Facebook's annual F8 developer conference, in San Jose, Calif. New York Attorney General Letitia James says a bipartisan coalition of state attorneys general is investigating Facebook for alleged antitrust issues. James said Friday, Sept. 6, 2019 the probe will look into whether Facebook's actions endangered consumer data, reduced the quality of consumers' choices or increased the price of advertising.

Details

Picture of Friends with benefits: Can Facebook tackle your love life?

Friends with benefits: Can Facebook tackle your love life?

This undated product image provide by Facebook shows screenshots of Facebook Dating, a mobile-only matchmaking service. On Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, the service will launch in the U.S.

Details

Picture of YouTube to pay $170M fine after violating kids’ privacy law

YouTube to pay $170M fine after violating kids’ privacy law

This March 20, 2018, file photo shows the YouTube app on an iPad in Baltimore. Google's video site YouTube has been fined $170 million to settle allegations it collected children's personal data without their parents' consent. The Federal Trade Commission fined Google $136 million and the company will pay an additional $34 million to New York state to resolve similar allegations.

Details

Picture of Facebook tightens political ad rules, but leaves loopholes

Facebook tightens political ad rules, but leaves loopholes

This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook moniker on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. Acknowledging misuse, Facebook is tightening its rules around political advertising ahead of the 2020 U.S. presidential elections.

Details

Picture of YouTube disables 200 videos attacking Hong Kong protests

YouTube disables 200 videos attacking Hong Kong protests

Protesters marching to demand democracy and political reforms in Hong Kong.

Details

;
;